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View Full Version : Questions about VPS and Colocation


Unregistered
11-30-2004, 08:34 PM
1. Do you use a service such as Alertra or Nagios to alert you when service is interuppted?

2. Do you ALWAYS send emails to clients when service is slowed or interuppted?

3. VPS sounds like a good solution for medium sized sites, but for the client looking to lessen or eliminate downtime, they still have no way of knowing if the server is being overloaded or not.

It seems to me that plenty of extra capacity is perhaps the most important ingredient in the whole picture of lessening downtime.

Now I want to beleive that you will do a good balance between profit for your company and insuring there is plenty of resources for clients, and I do beleive it, but

Do you publish a limit of accounts per VPS?

4. Last, help me understand colocation. Does it basically amount to a managed dedicated server or servers (which ever the client needs)?

Do your colocation packages receive the same support as vps or is client responsible for support?

When I compare the prices of your top 2 VPS packages with your Colocation ... I get lost.

It might be a good idea to have a simpler explanation of the total colocation cost for some who don't know which figures to add up to find a total.

For those like me, who are considering going from vps to a managed dedicated, it would be good to see the two compared. It might help with the decision making process.

And it might help you as well, if your colocation packages are defined as managed dedicateds.

Thanks for the explanations.

FH-Dave
11-30-2004, 09:53 PM
Thank you for your interest in our service. Please find below answers to your questions.

1. Do you use a service such as Alertra or Nagios to alert you when service is interuppted?


We use Alertra and Nagios for our external and internal monitoring tools. We only monitor the host server, and not the individual VPS accounts. This way, if there is a problem with the host server, we will be alerted. Since each VPS behaves like its own dedicated server, each running its own processes. Thus, it will not be efficient to monitor each individual VPS.


2. Do you ALWAYS send emails to clients when service is slowed or interuppted?


No, you will be responsible for monitoring your own services. However, we can also monitor services for you for extra charges. This is not offered by default, but is something that we are capable of doing.


3. VPS sounds like a good solution for medium sized sites, but for the client looking to lessen or eliminate downtime, they still have no way of knowing if the server is being overloaded or not.

It seems to me that plenty of extra capacity is perhaps the most important ingredient in the whole picture of lessening downtime.

Now I want to beleive that you will do a good balance between profit for your company and insuring there is plenty of resources for clients, and I do beleive it, but

Do you publish a limit of accounts per VPS?


The best way to know if we overselling our VPS is not through our own words, but through our customers' words/feedbacks/testimonials. We have quite a few VPS customers here that can give their feedbacks regarding our VPS platform.

We do not publish a limit of accounts per VPS. Even if we do, there will be no way for customers to check. We do control each VPS and make sure that we do not oversell (CPU resources and memory). If we start to oversell any particular node, we will either upgrade the resources on the server or start migrating some VPSes on other nodes. Having said this, we will not put more than 30-40 VPSes on each VPSes.

There have been benchmarks posted by customers where our VPS benchmark is higher than some other benchmarks form other VPS companies, although these companies advertises bigger VPS than ours and also limits on the number of VPSes per host node. This can simply mean that they put more VPS than they should and have been overselling. But then again, none of their customers will know.



4. Last, help me understand colocation. Does it basically amount to a managed dedicated server or servers (which ever the client needs)?


Collocation or colocation is just a service where we will host customer own server. So unlike dedicated server (where we provide and manage the server hardware), customer will purchase their own server and put it on our network. This way, the customer will get access to our reliable network and power as well as secure and clean data center.


Do your colocation packages receive the same support as vps or is client responsible for support?

When I compare the prices of your top 2 VPS packages with your Colocation ... I get lost.


Colocation service usually is very basic. We provide network connecitivity, power, and secure environment and client provide their own server and manage their own hardware. If needed, we can provide a remote hand/eye to customers. So when customer collocated server is having trouble, you can contact us and have us take a look at the server. This remote hand/eye service usually comes with additional charged.

With dedicated server, customer will not have to worry about the server itself. We manage the server hardware. In the event that something goes wrong with the server, we will replace and fix it under some guaranteed time. We also offer managed and un-managed dedicated server. With managed dedicated server, we will manage the server for application upgrades, OS upgrades/patches, etc.

There is also shared hosting service. Shared hosting customers has the least flexibility, but they have the least to worry about. The servers and all applications are managed by us. Since the server may be shared by hundreds of other customers, then customer may not be able to install any application they want, due to compatibility issues with other applications. All resources on the server is being shared by all customers on the server as well. Thus, a problem caused by a customer may potentially disrupt other customers as well.

Then there is VPS service. VPS sits in between shared hosting and dedicated server. It's shared because there are a number of VPS accounts on one hardware node, sharing the server resources. But unlike shared hosting environment, VPS accounts are being sand-boxed/isolated from other VPS accounts. Each VPS will receive their own guaranteed minimum CPU and memory resources while still having the ability to burst more than their minimum guaranteed resources (when the hardware node is not busy, for example). Because each VPS is being isolated from other VPSes, problem on one VPS account will not affect other VPSes. Customers also receive root access to their VPS and thus the VPS can be configured as pleased. These are the reasons why VPS behave like a dedicated server.

Shared hosting environment is usually the cheapest, but with some restrictions. If budget is not an issue, then dedicated server is the best solution. Of course one can also invest in buying their own server and colo the server with us at a reduced rate compared to renting a dedicated server with us. VPS bridges both the shared hosting environment and dedicated server solution. With VPS, one receives the dedicated-server experience at a much reduced rate.


For those like me, who are considering going from vps to a managed dedicated, it would be good to see the two compared. It might help with the decision making process.


You can start with VPS and when you outgrow your VPS, we can certainly provide you with dedicated server solution. We have several customers that have done exactly that, moving from VPS to dedicated server.

I hope I have answered your questions to within your satisfaction. Should you still have any further questions/concerns, feel free to contact us any time. You may also contact us at support[at]fluidhosting.com.

Thank you for your interest in our service. We are looking forward to working with you.

Unregistered
12-01-2004, 08:59 AM
Thanks Dave,

I appreciate you taking the time to explain all that in basic terms where even I could understand.

Actually, I'm a happy Fluid VPS customer already, I just needed some info about how things were handled and thought this was the best place to get a good answer.

VPS will work well for a time, when I grow to need an upgrade, I'll talk to you about a managed dedicated.

Thanks again

pingme
12-02-2004, 04:42 AM
Thanks Dave,

I appreciate you taking the time to explain all that in basic terms where even I could understand.

Actually, I'm a happy Fluid VPS customer already, I just needed some info about how things were handled and thought this was the best place to get a good answer.

Thanks again

:dunno: I am confused what are you trying :confused:

William
12-02-2004, 08:40 AM
I think he/she is just trying to get info on server upgrades bud. *shrugs